Tag: Jose Ma. Sison

Sison reveals real self in his order to NPA: ‘Kill one soldier a day’

COMMUNIST Party of the Philippines founding chairman Jose Ma. Sison inadvertently revealed his true self, his real personality when from his comfortable home in the Netherlands he declared a few days ago:

“The NPA in 17 regions has…the capacity of knocking out at least one AFP soldier every day per region. That eliminates at least 510 enemy troops or some five companies every month nationwide. That translates to the elimination of some 60 companies or 20 basic battalions every year.”

For Sison, the lives of Filipinos, soldiers sworn to defend the Republic from its enemies, are mere numbers, to be body-counted so he could estimate that killing just one soldier a day would mean wiping out 20 Philippine Army battalions.

In Sison’s 78-year old deranged mind, at that kill-rate and with the Army having 120 battalions, it would just take about five to six years for him to be put in power as head of a one-party state, the “People’s Republic of the Philippines.”

Sison’s calculation, with his one-soldier-a-day-killed assumption, reminded me of Nazi SS and Gestapo generals, dramatized in the film “Conspiracy,” calculating how many bodies its gas chambers could “accommodate” in 24 hours so the 3 million Jews in the countries it occupied could be “processed” in a year.

The myth and the reality: Determined freedom fighter, left; right, living it up in the Netherlands.

Sison is clueless that even if just one soldier were killed every week, that would mean a terrible war in our countrysides. The military won’t just sit on their asses, and would retaliate, and as all wars have proven, this war will result in thousands, even hundreds of innocents being killed. Continue reading

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‘If you want peace, prepare for war’

That was the slogan prominently displayed at the main assembly hall at the Moro Islamic Liberation Front’s headquarters called Camp Abubakar.

An aphorism from classical Rome (“Si vis pacem, para bellum”), it means that a nation or society is likely to be left in peace by its enemies if its military capacity to wage war is a deterrent enough—an idea that proved true during the Cold War’s arms race. The slogan speaks volumes of the MILF’s real thinking even with the peace talks: The Moro homeland will finally be left alone in peace when the government is confronted with an MILF that can really wage war.

In fact, in my interview then with the late MILF chairman Hashim Salamat, he explained that his organization’s strategy is not for a Maoist guerrilla war, but to match, battalion per battalion, the government’s military force—at which point government will have no choice but agree to an Islamic state in Mindanao. Ceasefire agreements during peace talks simply allow it to build up its forces. Indeed, the MILF force, which recently decimated an Army’s Special Forces platoon, is referred to as the 113th Base Command, already mimicking our Army’s organizational nomenclature.

I stayed at Camp Abubakar in Maguindanao for several days when I was correspondent for the Hong Kong-based magazine Far Eastern Economic Review. I still think the area, on a plateau with its idyllic fields, waterfalls and virgin forests, is one of the most beautiful places on earth. Such a colossal waste: even with the camp captured by government forces in 2000, the area is still deserted and will remain as such even for a century—because of the Muslim insurgency.

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